Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) 

What is AMH?
Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) is a hormone produced by small follicles in the ovary which contain eggs. The amount of AMH gives an indication of the number of eggs being produced, or ovarian reserve.


The amount of AMH measurable in the blood remains constant until early adulthood and from the age of 25 levels begin to decline. From the age of 35 AMH declines steadily until it reaches zero at the menopause. An AMH test gives us some insight into the remaining quantity of eggs and number of fertile years you may have, but it cannot tell us much about the quality of those eggs.


AMH (egg timer test)
The AMH test is a blood test and it can be performed any time throughout the menstrual cycle. It is used as a predictor of ovarian reserve, or more simply put, how many eggs you have left in reserve, hence the name Egg Timer Test. In relation to testing for AMH while on cyclic combined oral contraceptives, it is generally accepted that the Pill does not have an effect on AMH levels, but the evidence is not certain on this point.


Indications for testing 

 

How much does an AMH cost?
The AMH test costs $90 and is not covered by Medicare.


Clinical use?
An AMH level can be a useful tool for your fertility specialist planning treatment. It can guide clinicians on the dose and regimen of treatment. Lower levels of AMH may call for a larger dose of fertility medication.

 

Although AMH levels are a factor in achieving pregnancy, low or high levels
are not the only indicator for chances of conception. AMH levels decline at predictable rates hence the AMH test is a good snapshot of current fertility, however, it is recommended to treat “normal” results with caution. The main message is that AMH is one of many bits of information that builds a picture. It is not a test for egg quality, only quantity. You should ensure ongoing monitoring for best results when planning a family and future fertility success.